Zimbabwe ranked 17th most corrupt country in the world. 8th in Africa

Zimbabwe has been ranked the 17th most corrupt country on in the world and 8th in Africa in the latest rankings released by Transparency International this week.

In a list compiled and released annually by the organisation, Zimbabwe is now listed with a very low Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) Score of 21 in a possible range of index range of 0 (representing highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean).

The CPI scores and ranks countries based on how corrupt a country’s public sector is perceived to be. It is a composite index, a combination of surveys and assessments of corruption, collected by a variety of reputable institutions. The CPI is the most widely used indicator of corruption worldwide.

According to Transparency International, the score is based on perceptions as corruption comprises illegal activities, which are deliberately hidden and only come to light through scandals, investigations or prosecutions, therefore limiting the meaningful ways to assess absolute levels of corruption in countries or territories on the basis of hard data.

Here’s the list of 20 worst scoring countries in the world starting with the most corrupt:

Country2015 RankCorruption Perceptions Index 2015
Myanmar14722
Burundi15021
Cambodia15021
Zimbabwe15021
Uzbekistan15319
Eritrea15418
Syria15418
Turkmenistan15418
Yemen15418
Haiti15817
Guinea-Bissau15817
Venezuela15817
Iraq16116
Libya16116
Angola16315
South Sudan16315
Sudan16512
Afghanistan16611
Korea (North)1678
Somalia1678

Interestingly Zimbabwe scored worse than countries generally perceived to be more corrupt on the continent such as Nigeria – which has an index score of 26 and is ranked 32 most corrupt country in the world – and Kenya – 25 CPI and 28th most corrupt globally.

The only African countries reported to have more corruption than Zimbabwe in this year’s report are: Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Angola, Libya, Eritrea, and Guinea-Bissau, all countries that have faced civil unrest, wars or conflict of some kind in the last 15 years.

You can see and download all the data on the Transparency International website here.